You are here

The Council of Europe Framework Convention on the Value of Cultural Heritage for Society or the Faro Convention

Estonia is currently making preparations to join the Council of Europe Framework Convention on the Value of Cultural Heritage for Society. By the place of signing, it is abbreviated as the Faro Convention. By joining the Convention, Estonia confirms that cultural heritage plays an important role in modern society and relies on international principles in shaping heritage policy.

As of 2016, a total of 17 countries belonging to the Council of Europe have joined the Convention. Several countries have reported that they are engaged in making preparations to join the Convention. The Ministry of Culture makes preparations for joining in 2016 and 2017. Approval is likely to take place in 2018.

 

Innovative

The Faro Convention differs from other international conventions and tools. A majority of conventions speak about cultural heritage in the form of materials (be it buildings, archaeology or other things) and their preservation (conservation, authenticity, scientific aspect). The Faro Convention speaks about VALUES.
The Faro Convention neither focus on the need to protect heritage nor the ways to do it. Instead, attention is drawn to the USE of cultural heritage, and a series of justifications are introduced on how cultural heritage contributes to modern society.

 

Topical

Europe is currently in such stage of history, where on the one hand, the conception of identity and a sense of belonging are prejudiced, but on the other hand, these are fiercely defended. Cultural heritage creates and maintains the identity of people, nationalities, and countries. Cultural heritage and the culture at large plays an important role in building a peaceful society and resolving conflicts, especially at the very moment, when both Europe and the entire world face several problems related to globalisation, migration, religious, and cultural conflicts, as well as the growth of radicalisation. The Faro Convention encourages to take more advantage of cultural heritage both to build bridges and raise the quality of people’s everyday lives.

 

Four key messages

1. Cultural heritage is focused on a person, who creates and uses it.
2. Cultural heritage is a human right. Everyone has the right to share cultural heritage, and participate in its creation and conceptualisation. The right to share also involves responsibility.
3. In culture, similarly to natural environment, it is important to have diversity. Preserving cultural heritage helps to ensure cultural diversity.
4. Cultural heritage has a high potential in modern society: it raises people’s quality of life, it acts as an economic resource and a source of modern creation, it diversifies the living environment, and it is a part of sustainable development.

What will change upon joining the Convention?

  • Estonia officially recognises the Convention principles
  • The awareness of cultural heritage, its contribution to society, and its use options will increase
  • It is possible to rely on international legal framework in own activities
  • Prerequisites for the creation of new initiatives (for example, during the European Heritage Year 2018)
 

What is the schedule?

The Ministry of Culture makes preparations for joining in 2016 and 2017. Approval is likely to take place in 2018.

 

Working group

The Ministry of Culture makes preparations for joining in 2016 and 2017. Approval is likely to take place in 2018.

Liina Jänes – Cultural Heritage Adviser of the Ministry of Culture, Chairperson of the Working Group
Riin Alatalu
– Chairperson of Eesti ICOMOS MTÜ
Karmen Linask – Copyright Specialist of National Library of Estonia
Aivi Lintnermann – Director of the Folk Culture Centre
Elo Lutsepp – Head of the Centre of Rural Architecture
Merle Põld – Legal Adviser of the Ministry of Culture
Siim Raie – Director General at National Heritage Board of Estonia
Anneli Randla – Assistant Professor of the Estonian Academy of Arts
Pille Runnel – Research Director of the Estonian National Museum
Mirjam Rääbis – Museum Adviser of the Ministry of Culture
Margit Siim – Coordinator of UNESCO Cultural Programmes of the Estonian National Museum
Helle Solnask – Management Board Member of the Estonian Heritage Society
Helen Sooväli-Sepping – Senior Research Fellow of the Centre for Landscape and Culture of Tallinn University
Ülle Talihärm – Libraries Adviser of the Ministry of Culture
 

The task of the working group is to coordinate Estonia’s joining process to the framework convention of the Council of Europe about the value of cultural heritage in society and prepare the joining documents. The ministries and other interest groups will be involved in the course of activities.

 

 

What is the framework convention?

The framework convention is a set of principles or a framework. The framework convention defines wider objectives, fields of activities, and trends towards which to move, however, the country itself is responsible for the method to achieve these objectives. Unlike traditional conventions, the framework convention does not impose any binding obligations on the country.

 

Estonia has previously joined the following conventions:

References to research

 

 

More information

Liina Jänes
Cultural Heritage Adviser of the Ministry of Culture
Liina.Janes@kul.ee
Telephone: +372 628 2381

 

Last updated: 20 December 2016